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Old 05-09-2007, 11:56 PM
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jhitchin jhitchin is offline
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Default How does one become a stamp class teacher?

Yesterday I was in Rubber Soul in Redmond, Washington (it's in the same location as a theater I'm doing a show in right now), and while I was picking up some new small stamps from Lockhart a woman new to the hobby was picking up some items to do a large batch of cards.

She had gone through the sale bin and found a solid square with an irregular border that she seemed to like, but she wasn't sure what to do with it. The clerk suggested shadow stamp ink but the woman said she wanted to use some of her more vivid chalk inks.

I stepped up and said, "Try this." I flipped the stamp rubber side up. "Ink up the stamp with the chalk ink. Next, take a background stamp, or some other stamp and press it into the inked rubber. Now, stamp the solid stamp. You'll get a bright square with a lighter pattern in it, almost like a resist."

The customer's eyes lit up and she said, "Yeah! That would work!"

The clerk looked at me and said, "Thanks for the lesson. So, when's the class?"

I shrugged that off for a moment and then thought, "Wait a minute... Why can't I teach rubber stamp classes? I've only been doing this for 16 years."

Only, I'm not sure how this happens... Any ideas?

Jeff
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Old 05-10-2007, 12:37 AM
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I say go for it. Prepare a class outline for whatever you would like to teach with the object of the class, answers to common questions, tips, techniques and such along with example cards/projects. Then present it to the stamp store if that's where you would like to teach. When I first started stamping I took some classes at a local community center. Just saturday classes for a couple of hours. That's another place you could teach.
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Old 05-10-2007, 06:28 AM
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My local Michaels is always looking for people to teach classes. Amy gave some great advice, I agree put together a outline for the class you want to teach and go talk with store owners and managers in your area. You might want to include some examples of your work too, kind of like an artist's portfolio. They might already have something they want taught and seeing your work will prove you have the ability to teach that too.

We also have a community center here where people can take classes. A bit more risky IMO because I think you have to pay for the supplies and if you don't get enough response you will end up losing money. Another option however, and more profit if you are successful.
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Old 05-10-2007, 07:22 AM
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I say go for it. When I owned a brick and mortar store, I loved it when someone wanted to teach a class for me. That was one less thing I had to do, it was profitable for the teacher, and if they did their class right, it was profitable for me in sales. Just be sure to use stamps/supplies that are readily available in the store. You can check with the store owner and find out if there are any classes that people are asking for, also.
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Old 05-10-2007, 08:05 AM
stampin stacy
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One other idea, contact a stamping convention in your area about being a helper for experience.
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Old 05-10-2007, 08:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Becky P View Post
I say go for it. When I owned a brick and mortar store, I loved it when someone wanted to teach a class for me. That was one less thing I had to do, it was profitable for the teacher, and if they did their class right, it was profitable for me in sales.
Just curious - as a stamp store owner, how much would you pay a someone who teaches a class for you? Say a two hour long class, for example. Does it depend on how many students sign up? Who pays for the supplies used in class, the store or the instructor?

Kate
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Old 05-10-2007, 08:15 AM
Stampalotsue
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I think the people who teach at my LSS get a cut of the fee paid for the class. If the fee is $25 a person, they might get $15.00 of that. They also have a minimum participant level.... in other words, if only one person signs up, they will not have the class. I think they need at least five people.

The store also offers a 10% discount to the participants, so as to encourage shopping... definitely make sure you are using stamps and inks, etc., that are readily available there at that store.

This is something I have thought about doing... they offer a LOT of scrap classes, but few stamping. After 18 years of stamping, I could surely teach something!
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Old 05-10-2007, 08:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CatStamper View Post
Just curious - as a stamp store owner, how much would you pay a someone who teaches a class for you? Kate
Depends on the class and the teacher. I'm sure every store is different, so what applied to my store would not apply to the store in the next town, or the next county, even. Or even a different teacher, maybe. I had some who wanted to furnish all the supplies, some who wanted me to furnish all the supplies, so they were compensated differently.

If you are serious about teaching a class, talk it over with the store owner. Find out what is expected of you, as a teacher, and what their obligations are. Do you furnish all materials? Do they furnish all materials? What is the minimum number for a class to be held? What is the rate of compensation? When is their class sign-up cutoff so you will know how many to prepare for? If you have any concerns (what about kids in classes, etc.), bring them up at that time. Don't wait for the day of the class and be surprised.

Take a representative sample of your work so they can see what you have to offer.

I'm sure there are more things that I have forgotten. Someone else jump in here?
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