Rubber Stamp Chat

Rubber Stamp Chat (http://www.rubberstampchat.net/index.php)
-   Ask MaryJo McGraw (http://www.rubberstampchat.net/forumdisplay.php?f=57)
-   -   Stamping on Wood (http://www.rubberstampchat.net/showthread.php?t=1972)

Spideycindy 10-02-2008 09:25 PM

Stamping on Wood
 
MaryJo
This is quite an honor for us to be able to ask you questions! Thank you and thank you Amy for providing this opportunity for us. My question is what advise and what all can we do stamping on veneer wood? I have not done this yet and aside from hearing we need to seal the wood first to stop bleeding what exploration have you done with stamping on wood, and what products do you suggest we explore.
Thanks so much for your answer.
Spideycindy

jfricker 10-03-2008 02:53 AM

I too will be interested in this answer.

Joan

maryjomcgraw 10-03-2008 05:58 AM

Stamping on plain wood (unfinished) is easy use either Staz-On or any type of pigment ink. Finished wood is more difficult. Staz-On should work in most instances, acrylic paint or try embossing(again plain old style pigment will work). Dark wood will be difficult to color but depending on what exact finish you have acrylic or oil paint should work.
MJ

maryjomcgraw 10-03-2008 06:21 AM

To continue my thought .....I always think of more after I write down the first answer!
When you say wood veneer I am going to guess that you mean unfinished since there was a mention of bleeding. The wood itself does not need to be sealed. It will make your choices more varied if it is unsealed and pigment inks should be fine for unfinished and not bleed.You can use more things to color unsealed wood like colored pencil some types of pen, paints,etc To seal the wood and maintain its color and unfinished look you could use a light spray of anytype of fixative or matte varnish but then you create a more non-porous surface then you must go back to using Staz-on to stamp with.
MJ

cmcveigh 10-03-2008 12:02 PM

I just want to share the results of an unfinished wood box done in 2002. The base coat was either black gesso, or McCloskey's Special Effects Metallic glaze, or acrylic metallic paint sponged or brushed in various places. From there, as MaryJo said, plain old embossing as with paper worked for the rest of the detail. Some areas were colored with light-body acrylic paints.

The only part that was sealed was the lid -- painted over the black gesso with a primer/sealer. It gave the lid a nice sheen, but not too glossy.

Elements of Zia Slideshow

Specifics

Spideycindy 10-03-2008 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmcveigh (Post 23644)
I just want to share the results of an unfinished wood box done in 2002. The base coat was either black gesso, or McCloskey's Special Effects Metallic glaze, or acrylic metallic paint sponged or brushed in various places. From there, as MaryJo said, plain old embossing as with paper worked for the rest of the detail. Some areas were colored with light-body acrylic paints.

The only part that was sealed was the lid -- painted over the black gesso with a primer/sealer. It gave the lid a nice sheen, but not too glossy.

Elements of Zia Slideshow

Specifics

Wow that is beautiful!
Spideycindy

Juanita2343 10-04-2008 12:10 AM

Stamping on Wood
 
What about a non-solvent ink for stamping on unfinished wood?
Thanks.
Actually, to be more specific. The Stewart Superior ink table suggests that pigment ink on wood would need to be heat fixed? I really don't know much about rubber stamping. Just feeling my way here.
I'm looking for a non-solvent ink that wouldn't require heat to stamp on unfinished wood. Someone suggested soy based ink. I'll be using this in a workshop and I would like something that would dry quickly? What about Stewart's India Ink or Versacraft? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks so much for your time.
Best,
Juanita

maryjomcgraw 10-04-2008 07:46 AM

Old style colorbox does not need to be heat set on unfinished wood. India ink of most types would bleed on soft woods like pine which most craft items are made from. Versacraft would be fine and a light heat setting of any ink would speed up the drying so it can't hurt! BTW most ink companies don't know what their inks can do let alone know what anyone else's ink will do so test it for yourself first, LOL.
MJ

cmcveigh 10-04-2008 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Juanita2343 (Post 23752)
Someone suggested soy based ink. I'll be using this in a workshop and I would like something that would dry quickly?

From Wikipedia:

One major problem with soy ink is that it takes more time to dry than petroleum-based inks, due to its lack of evaporative solvents in the form of VOCs.

Soy Ink

Juanita2343 10-04-2008 05:59 PM

Stamping on Wood
 
MaryJo and CMCVeigh-Thanks for both your responses. I will be using a pine like wood and drying time is an issue. Thanks for both your responses. Very helpful.
Best,
Juanita


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:16 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=