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Scenic Stamping with Kevin Nakagawa of Stampscapes Kevin gives detailed answers regarding scenic stamping, techniques and color application.

 
 
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  #11  
Old 05-10-2009, 02:37 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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I don't think I'll be out teaching classes this year and next year will depend on how long it takes me to get some new things into production like new designs and things like online instructional videos. There's always a thousand things that I want to do and wish there were 48 hours in a day to get to them. Always keeps things interesting but, on the other side, it keeps me from other things that I love to do like travel and teach classes.
  #12  
Old 05-10-2009, 06:47 AM
stampin stacy
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We are very grateful that you are talking with and teaching us this week. Thank you so very much!!
  #13  
Old 05-10-2009, 07:36 AM
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TheAfricanQueen TheAfricanQueen is offline
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I'm in agreement with Stacy. Your spending time with us this week has been invaluable! My hopes for you are all the best and I do hope one day to take a class from you.
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  #14  
Old 05-10-2009, 07:28 PM
marstamper marstamper is offline
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My daughter and I took a class from Kevin, years ago. We have never forgotten, and still LOVE all his designs, stamps, pictures, and everything about his artistic talents!! I have so many of his stamps, and won't part with any of them!!
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  #15  
Old 05-10-2009, 09:25 PM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Been enjoying the time with you all. I love to talk about rubber stamping which, believe it or not, I don't do very often.

There have been some excellent questions that have made me think. It's been a while since I taught classes so it's been good to put a lot of the concepts into words. Been some pretty advanced questions here that I've never been asked before too. ~K
  #16  
Old 05-10-2009, 11:09 PM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stampin stacy View Post
Have you ever heard of using the color white or very light colors to draw the viewer in and across a scene?

I have heard and seen this theory explained at a local museum of western art. Basically if I understand correctly, using white across the picture in various ways draws the eye in and then across the scene. Is that correct?
Here's an interesting painting. In another response to this question, I mentioned how I like to create spots of light and to separate them with the use of shade. In this painting:

http://maariusz.deviantart.com/art/T...icorn-95450146

(you can click on the scene at this line above and it will enlarge it)

check out the lighting scheme. One source of light and another area of reflected light. My eye goes from that source of light and wanders down to the unicorn. Then, my eye proceeds to wander around in the shadows to find out what other little treasures are to be found.
  #17  
Old 05-10-2009, 11:58 PM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piecesandpom View Post
Lovely question Stacy! Can't wait for the answer.

I'm drawn to the use of darks in much of the Stampscapes gallery but am always intrigued by how the light or white pulls me in. How does the artist know when enough light or white is enough? (I'm always worried I may add too much and don't know when to stop!)
I forgot to answer your question here.

We really don't add in light but retain light by not shading in those areas. The way that I approach shading is to shade very incrementally so things develop relatively slow. Then, when I achieve a certain degree of contrast from my darkest areas to my lightest, I evaluate if I left too much light usually. If I did, I simply return to lighter tones and use those to darken the areas in question further.

But, never be afraid to add too much of anything. It's always better to go past the point of "enough". If we do, we'll usually know we have and we'll make a mental note and learn from that. I tell my classes (and I always remind myself) that I'd much rather see them go too far than to fear going over that point. When people are too conservative it might keep them from reaching that point where they know they've taken something as far as a piece should go. The apex. There are plenty of times that I take things farther than I think I should have --at that time-- but figuring out some solution often reveals an even better final piece anyway. ~K
  #18  
Old 05-11-2009, 12:38 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAfricanQueen View Post
I'm always trying to 'color' water, but understand from some artist friends of mine that water is the color of what it reflects.

Will you shed some light on that (no pun intended)?
I love some of Maxfield Parrish's landscapes. Here's a link to a great example of the concept of water reflecting sky here:

http://chicagoboyz.net/archives/2709.html

Or here's a contemporary artist that I really love the works of:

http://www.treadwaygallery.com/ONLIN...ntWEB/0703.jpg
  #19  
Old 05-13-2009, 06:31 AM
stampin stacy
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Those are wonderful examples thank you for the links.

Here is the pieces that I heard it explained with. It's more of a left to right movement and easier to "see" in real life as this painting is HUGE:

http://www.cartermuseum.org/works-of-art/1961-381
  #20  
Old 05-13-2009, 11:26 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stampin stacy View Post
Those are wonderful examples thank you for the links.

Here is the pieces that I heard it explained with. It's more of a left to right movement and easier to "see" in real life as this painting is HUGE:

http://www.cartermuseum.org/works-of-art/1961-381
That's a nice piece. Yes, those little specks of white help to pull out the figures and keep the eye moving. The angles and positions of the characters and the slant of the background hill help as well. My eye moves from left to right to those figures in pursuit and then the downward slope of the land over their heads returns me to the left like a squished oval.

Notice the orangish ground and the purplish shadows.
 

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