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Scenic Stamping with Kevin Nakagawa of Stampscapes Kevin gives detailed answers regarding scenic stamping, techniques and color application.

 
 
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  #1  
Old 05-04-2009, 09:08 AM
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piecesandpom piecesandpom is offline
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Thumbs up Two Questions

Okay, I've got two questions.

What is your favorite matte paper and ink combination? I sometimes don't get a good image when I want to so I'd like to know how to improve the image. (I'm not into glossy probably 'cause my glossy card stash is the cheaper stuff!)

Also, will anyone be bringing Stampscapes stamps to the W. Springfield MA show in June?
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  #2  
Old 05-05-2009, 12:27 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Hello Karen. For matte paper, a smooth surface is always the best for high density stippled imagery. The reason being is that stippled images are comprised of dots and any paper with "tooth" to it will remove a high percentage of these defining dots leaving one with a partial image. Linear images are fine on papers with tooth to them because if there are any gaps in the lines, our minds fill in the missing information but tonal images missing a lot of information can look fragmented. There are hot press papers of all kinds which work well as well as coated non-glossy papers that do very well with highly detailed imagery.

As far as inks go, dye based inks work well but unlike glossy paper I wouldn't layer as many colors on top of one another like one can on glossy. Glossy coating binds the surface of paper and keeps the surface integrity intact with as many layers of ink that you might want to use on it but matte paper can potentially buckle. You have to experiment with any combination of media but a good bet on matte paper are stipple brushes in combination with dye based inks. The saturation doesn't become as thick as methods like sponging methods but the results are beautiful in their own right. Other inks that can be used are dye based inks straight out of ink pens such as Tombow, LePlume, etc. Copic markers are the new rage out there and their alcohol based inks look great in scenic stamping with either a straight-from-pen application or the airbrushing method.

W. Springfield --Yes, our long time retailer in Maine (Pen Ventures) will have a booth featuring the Stampscapes line.

~KN
  #3  
Old 05-05-2009, 11:11 AM
wallace61074
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Default Inks and papers

Hi Karen
I love the cryogen white paper and copic markers for Stampscapes and all of my stamping as well. It's a totally different look than the glossy but I love it. I also use the airbrush system with this and I use memento black ink to stamp in, it doesn't fade over time either. You can also use their inks with the stipple brushes and it stays true as well.
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Old 05-05-2009, 11:39 AM
stampin stacy
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What inks should one not use on glossy cardstock or are there certain types of glossy that don't work as well, another words issues with them not absorbing and drying properly.
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Old 05-05-2009, 01:18 PM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stampin stacy View Post
What inks should one not use on glossy cardstock or are there certain types of glossy that don't work as well, another words issues with them not absorbing and drying properly.
If you're going for a transparent layered look, you would avoid pigment inks on glossy paper.

I'm not an authority on paper and ink combinations because there are so many different brands of inks out there these days so if anyone else can add their thoughts, that would be great.

What I've found, on occasion with certain brands of inks with certain papers, was that if I layered multiple inks down for my background colors and stamped my images on top of those colors the impressions would "run" (blur) upon drying. There's an easy remedy to this, however, in that one could simply apply a sealant to the inks before they dried. I like using something like an art spray fixative or an acrylic type of spray on the top of my scenes anyway as I like the saturated appearance they give to the inks so spraying inks before they dry isn't a big deal. I have a little paragraph devoted to these sprays here:

http://stampscapes.com/info_techniques.html#fadinglight

Oh, Judikins has that rub on sealant (I forgot the name) that also works well.

Other types of inks --if you're doing a multiple thick ink layering technique-- might be too thick to apply upon one of the consecutive layers. For example, I love using thicker brands of inks such as Ranger or the Mementos for my first couple layers of colors because they provide a nice foundation for any other brands of inks. They almost provide a "lubricated" semi-sealed surface to the paper which makes the inks easy to apply as far as blending goes. The one problem with multiple layers of these thicker inks is that the paper can reach a super saturation and, as you're trying to apply a given color, you'll find that it's not only not adhering to the paper but it might be pulling *off* ink that you've already applied. There's a simple remedy to this in that you can semi-heat set the card which will evaporate some of the moisture content and will allow for additional tones of ink. What I usually do is to use the thicker layers of ink on the bottom 2 or 3 layers of colors and then I'll use my thinner layers of ink over the top of them. In my case, the thicker layers would be something like Ranger or those Memento inks and then I'll use something like Marvy or Vivid brand colors over the top of them. I don't always adhere to this as I'll often use additional thicker colors on the top layers of inks but I just have to wait a little in between coats to allow for a little drying time.

That's my take on ink/paper combinations. Now there's this other glossy paper that I've tried that's available in Australia. I think it's Indonesian. It's super thick and very very coated. Beautiful to work on but after a couple layers of ink it doesn't allow for much ink transference so you really have to allow inks to set up longer before applying additional coats or you'll have to heat set.

Bottom line is to experiment. Experiment and spray. ~K
  #6  
Old 05-06-2009, 10:22 AM
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piecesandpom piecesandpom is offline
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Lovely ideas here!

I do love the c. white with the black ink - every card I've made for the holiday fair with Stampscapes has sold when I add just a little twinkle of white highlights and glitter/glitter pen darks.

This reminded me that I haven't yet tried Momento or Versafine Onyx with Stampscapes on mulberry paper. . .got to experiment with that combination. I love this combo because you get even more colors if you back the mulberry paper to a background layer, similar to layering a vellum to a background layer.
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Old 05-06-2009, 11:08 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piecesandpom View Post
Lovely ideas here!

I do love the c. white with the black ink - every card I've made for the holiday fair with Stampscapes has sold when I add just a little twinkle of white highlights and glitter/glitter pen darks.

This reminded me that I haven't yet tried Momento or Versafine Onyx with Stampscapes on mulberry paper. . .got to experiment with that combination. I love this combo because you get even more colors if you back the mulberry paper to a background layer, similar to layering a vellum to a background layer.
Sounds interesting. You'll have to let me know how that works out if you try it. ~K
  #8  
Old 05-09-2009, 11:52 AM
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Default Samples - Ink and Mulberry

I experimented last night with Momento Black/Cocoa and Versafine Black on Mulberry last night. I've attached them to this thread. The top row is the Momento. . .the black I would turn into a wintery scene I think. I do like the Cocoa on the orangey mulberry but the images aren't as clear.
I know it's not the mulberry 'cause the Versafine Black on the white mulberry shows up much cleaner. I haven't yet frayed the edges on this one so it's not showing up as mulberry in the scan. . .

So, I think as in all things it's what you like. The cocoa speaks to my Impressionist leanings and the Versafine Black speaks to the more precise but elegant side.

I'll try to see if I can get the scenes more complete, colored and onto cards if folks would like. . .
Attached Images
File Type: jpg StampscapesonMulberry2.jpg (28.5 KB, 41 views)
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Last edited by piecesandpom; 05-09-2009 at 11:54 AM. Reason: Upload attachment
  #9  
Old 05-09-2009, 02:30 PM
stampin stacy
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Quote:
I'll try to see if I can get the scenes more complete, colored and onto cards if folks would like. . .
who me?? forced to look at scenic stamp work, oh no........

YES PLEASE!
  #10  
Old 05-10-2009, 02:38 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
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Love the look of that Mulberry paper!
 

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