Rubber Stamp Chat


Go Back   Rubber Stamp Chat > Library Archives > Guest Artist Archives > Scenic Stamping with Kevin Nakagawa of Stampscapes

Scenic Stamping with Kevin Nakagawa of Stampscapes Kevin gives detailed answers regarding scenic stamping, techniques and color application.

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 05-13-2009, 11:40 AM
stmpstone
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kevin, I've learned so much these last few days.....more about the art than the stamping. The two go hand in hand and since I can't draw my stamping must remain my base. Thank you so much for sharing about yourself and your art.
Claudia in Las Vegas
  #22  
Old 05-13-2009, 03:23 PM
k_nak k_nak is offline
Stampscapes
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 136
Default

Enjoyed "chatting" with my fellow rubber stampers Claudia. I've learned a lot myself over the past few days. I've been finding my way around this site and all the posts. Amy's provided a great community here that's full of info. ~K
  #23  
Old 05-13-2009, 04:01 PM
stampin stacy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
like a squished oval


You mean like don't limit your colors, see I was paying attention

I do need to get better about adding shadows though, I forget most times unless its very obvious.
  #24  
Old 05-14-2009, 12:00 AM
k_nak k_nak is offline
Stampscapes
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 136
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stampin stacy View Post


You mean like don't limit your colors, see I was paying attention

I do need to get better about adding shadows though, I forget most times unless its very obvious.
Shadows are one of the most forgotten elements in stamping and it's understandable. It's hard to tell where to put them, what shape they would take for a given object, and what color to make them. I would have the same questions but I just fake it. At the base of most objects, I just put a darker color of whatever the base of the object is. If I have a tree in a field of green grass, I'll just use a darker green at the base of the tree. If a rock is coming out of blue water, I'll do a darker version of the blue water at the base of the rock. Most of my shadows aren't technically accurate as far as what I do with light but I don't really care either. I go for ease and it's effective enough.

These shadows anchor the objects to the surfaces and gives them solidity and opacity. In other words, the shadows state that light isn't penetrating the objects and shining right through them. They're fun to do and can be really subtle if we just start out with going slightly darker than the area around them and just build them up into darker colors accordingly (what looks "right" to your eye as far as how dark the shadows are looking).
 

Bookmarks
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=