remoistening ink pads [Archive] - Rubberstampchat

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bjames
09-08-2007, 07:32 AM
Is there a recipe for remoistening either pigment or dye based ink pads? There is still ink in the pads, but some are becoming very dry.

cmcveigh
09-08-2007, 10:15 AM
Ranger makes a product specifically for this purpose, called "Perfect Ink Refresher". Don't know what's in it, so can't make any recommendations of how to DIY at home. I do know that the PearlEx metallic inkpads can be squirted with plain (distilled) water.

stampin stacy
09-08-2007, 12:03 PM
Thank you I couldn't remember the name of the refresher spray and was too lazy to go try to find it. It worked OK for me, gave me some life back to my stamps but they were still a long way from a juicy new pad. I do not recommend them for metallic pigment pads, it messed mine up and now they are funky when I use them. I prefer a reinker myself, even if the pad has ink left, it adds moisture too.

cmcveigh
09-08-2007, 02:10 PM
I do not recommend them for metallic pigment pads, it messed mine up and now they are funky when I use them. I prefer a reinker myself.

Really?? It messed up your metallic pads? I did not know that the refresher would do that. Thanks for sharing. Speaking of re-inking -- is there a recommended way to re-ink?? I've never in 7 years seen any articles on how much ink to put on the pad, or whether to store it upside down, or whether you should wait a period of time before using it to let it absorb. Why is there no info on this??? And, where do you find the best place/price for re-inkers?

Inquiring minds want to know.....
Cheryl

Stampo
09-08-2007, 02:36 PM
I just sold a lady a bottle of "Perfect Ink Refresher" this morning... didn't even know we had it in the store. LOL We sell stamps and supplies on consignment and the first time I see it is when it comes through the cash register... anyway, dye ink pads should be stored upside down so the ink runs to the surface... it doesn't matter which way you store pigment pads.

Inky Whiskers
09-08-2007, 03:22 PM
Really?? It messed up your metallic pads? I did not know that the refresher would do that. Thanks for sharing. Speaking of re-inking -- is there a recommended way to re-ink?? I've never in 7 years seen any articles on how much ink to put on the pad, or whether to store it upside down, or whether you should wait a period of time before using it to let it absorb. Why is there no info on this??? And, where do you find the best place/price for re-inkers?

Inquiring minds want to know.....
Cheryl

Bummer, Stacy! I hate it when a product doesn't do what it says it will. :swear:

Dye ink pads & pigment ink pads require different techniques for reinking, but neither is complicated.

dye ink pads ~ another way to determine if your dye ink pad needs more ink (besides noticing that the ink appears to be faded when stamping) is to look at the sides of the felt pad. With regular dye inks the felt will start turning white around the edges as the ink gets used up. Regular dye inks don't stain the synthetic felt used for most dye ink pads. The woven top layer will be stained the color of the ink and this white layer will be under that & visible on all 4 sides on the pad.

To reink: squeeze a quarter sized dollop of dye ink onto the center of the pad (this is for regular size pads, use maybe a dime sized or smaller drop for mini pads) & watch to see how fast it absorbs. If your pad is really dry, the ink will suck up in 2-3 seconds leaving a darker area on the pad. Keep doing this until the pad is mostly this darker color. As the pad refills, absorbtion will slow down and the white on the edges will fill in with color. When the white is gone and the surface has only a bit of the lighter color around the edges, STOP ADDING INK! Over inking can make a BIG mess. You want your pad comfortably full of ink and looking dark but not wet on the surface. If you have too much ink on the pad & it won't absorb, use a paper towel to blot the excess off so it doesn't drip & ooze every where. When a dye pad is new or freshly reinked you can store them with the pad facing up, but after a few uses turn them over when storing so the pad is facing down & gravity can keep the ink at the surface of the pad. You can use your reinked pad as soon as all the ink is done soaking in, but tap lightly or you will get ink in the negative spaces of the rubber & ruin your image.

permanent &/or solent dye inks ~ These inks won't have the white line around the edges, but the ink will appear faded when stamping. The reinking process is the same, but you will have to really watch the absorbtion and stop as soon as the ink stops absorbing quickly. Keeping the lil clear plastic cover that comes with many permanent inks and putting it back on before storing will help slow down the drying out of these pads, but the ink by nature dries quickly and you may have to add a dollop of fresh ink every time you get it out to refresh the ink, especially if you haven't used then in awhile). If you don't have the lil plastic inner lid (or your pad didn't come with one) you can use a piece of clingy platic wrap on top of the pad & under the lid. Since they dry out faster than regular dye inks, I store them on their lids to keep the ink close to the surface at all times. You can use the pad as all the ink is done soaking in, but tap lightly or you will get ink in the negative spaces of the rubber & ruin your image.

pigment inks ~ These ink pads aren't as obvious about being out of ink. Your only clue will be that when you stamp with them the image looks faded. To refresh these pads keep an old credit card handy & gently bounce the edge of the card across the sponge ink pad like you are cutting veggies. This motion compresses the sponge and urges the ink to the surface. If your pad is really dry this may only get you thru' one project & may not help with metallic inks. This will also help reblend the ink if the base ink has separated from the pigment during a long storage period.

To reink: apply the reinker in a thin swirling pattern across the surface of the sponge pad. Do not cover more than half the surface with ink. Use the plastic card to gently "chop" across the pad in one direction. Repeat this motion from differnt directions until the ink is absorbed. Wipe the ink that may accumilate on the card off on the pad and chop it in. If the ink absorbed quickly, you can do a 2nd smaller application of ink. You'll know if you've over inked when the ink oozes out the sides of the pad while chopping. Pigment ink should be stored with the pad facing up. The 2 part ink has been known to separate when stored pad down and the base fluid (often glycerin based) will ooze out the sides of the pad, making a gooey mess. You can use the pad right away, but press gently while inking or it will ooze into the negative spaces ruining your stamped image. Don't forget to wash & dry the credit card after each color reinked so as to not contaminate the pads. This method also works with the StazOn Opaque ink pads.

For finding the best prices on reinkers I recommend you try these 4 options:

1) eBay ~ the prices are often lower than the retail prices offered at web stores or locally, but the selection can be very eratic making it difficult to find the brand & colors you need when you need them.
2) Froogle ~ this off shoot of Google will find several web sites that carry what you want then list them from least expensive down. It doens't list ALL web stores that carry that product however. (try "dye ink refills" for a general listing or "Ranger dye ink refills" or whatever the brand is for a more specific list)
3) Go to the manufacturer's website to find out who locally or on the web may carry the refills you want then go hunting for the best price.
4) Get on the email notice or newsletter list for a website you like to shop at that carries the reinkers for your stamp pads. This way you will know when they have a sale that can save you some $.

Refills are usually about half the price of new pads, so well worth the investment. I usually buy the refill when I buy the pad if where I am carries the refills. Why don't all stores that carry the pads carry the refills? With the big retail chains, it's 'cause the pads cost more & they're hoping you'll just buy a new pad when yours runs dry out of ignorance. Also, those lil bottles are a pain to stock & easily stolen. I can't speak for the boutique stores as they may have other reasons for not carrying refills besides those I mentioned. I only know of one local store in my area that carries all the refills for the pads they stock. They don't carry all the brands of inks I own, so I go online for the others I need. Just know that most quality ink pad manufacturers also make refills for those pads, so unless the line has been discontinued you should be able to find refills for your pads.

Sorry this is SO long! If anybody wants to know how to clean a stamp pad (dye or pigment) that has gotten stained with another color or how to convert a discontinued color ink pad to another color, just post your request here & I'll entertain y'all with more info I learned the hard way. :lol:

cmcveigh
09-08-2007, 03:39 PM
Holy Cow! This is more information than I could imagine getting as a response!!! Thank you so much, Jenna. I didn't know any of that, except I would scrape the ink onto a pad using an old credit card, almost like frosting a cake - but it never seemed very effective. Now I know to bounce the card onto the pad -- your suggestions make so much sense. Thank you for taking the time to educate me on all of this!!

I appreciate it very much,
Cheryl

stampin stacy
09-08-2007, 09:35 PM
Ditto on the thank you Jenna, WOW. Now you have me wondering if the chop action will mix the refresher into the metallic ink pads that I thought were ruined. Definitely going to give this a try this week. :clap: Have not been able to find a gold exactly like the one I have so would be very happy if I can "fix" it.

alsmouse
09-08-2007, 09:46 PM
WOWWhat a lot of information. Thank you, Jenna! Ok here's one I haven't seen yet, on the multi color or rainbow pads. What is the best way to refresh them?

Inky Whiskers
09-09-2007, 01:14 AM
You are all very welcome! Cheryl is so right about useful knowledge like this not being easy to find. I learned what I've shared from bits & pieces gleaned from manufactures sites, magazines & personal trial & error over the years. Personal experience is how I know that overinking is a BAD idea! :lol:

Yes, Stacy, the chopping motion should help mix the refresher with the old ink. It's at least worth a try. If you can't find the correct brand/color of ink you can use another similar color of ink as long as its the same type. i.e. use only pigment ink in a sponge pad & only dye ink in a felt pad. So if the gold pigment ink you want isn't available anymore you can do one of the below options:

1) Reink the discontinued color ink pad with a new similar color. The color when stamping may at first be slightly different than either the old or new color as it will be a blend of the two, but with furture reinkings the color will shift to the new color.

2) If the new color you want to use is very different from the color in the pad, you'll need to wash the pad in warm soapy water to get the old ink out. Start by holding the pad under the running tap and letting the water run over the pad while running your finger down the pad with medium firm pressure (you can press harder on felt pads, but go easy on the sponge pads so you don't tear them) flushing the old ink out. Think of it as a stamp pad massage & maybe wear gloves if you don't like your hands stained with ink that lasts for a few days. When the water runs clear w/o you pressing on the pad, put a dime size dollop of liquid soap or shampoo on the pad and gently rub it in to help loosen any hiding ink. Felt pads will be white on the edges once the ink is mostly out even tho' the woven top layer may be stained. Sponge pads may or may not change colors depending on what color ink they were originally. After working the soap in, flush the pad again in warm running water until all traces of the soap are gone. Let sponge pads dry sponge side down on old or paper towels then add new ink. If the felt pad surface is badly stained, you can put the pad in a bleach bath overnight to nutralize any remaining ink & remove most of the stain. Run hot tap water into a bowl deep enough to hold the dye pad with the lid off (most flip top dye ink lids can be removed by gently applying pressure on the short edges of the lid near the hinge seam and popping the lil posts out of the lil holes they sit it on the hinge pieces) & add just a dollop of laundry bleach to the water or apply gel pen bleach directly to the pad. If you don't want to wait overnight, you can rinse the felt pad once the water has cooled to room temp. Be sure to rinse the pad thoroghly to get all the bleach out. If the pad or the water coming off it feels slippery, there's still bleach in the pad. The surface may be yellowish, but once you add new ink it won't matter. Let the pad dry out completely then add the new ink. I do suggest putting a sticker label on the pad lid or side with the new color name on it if you've radically changed the color. :D WARNING! DO NOT BLEACH SPONGE PADS!!! The bleach may "eat" the pad & ruin it forever.

I have an answer for you too, alsmouse! :lol:
Dye ink rainbow pads come in 2 forms: the kaleidacolor pads where the lil felt pads are separate during storage and the multiple colors in one pad kind. The K pads are easy, just reink them like you would a regular felt pad, but only add a few spots of ink at a time as those lil pads fill up quick & trying to stuff a paper towel down in between those lil pads to absorb ink overflow is a pain, let me tell ya! The single pad kind are a bit trickier. First you have to figure out what the original 5 colors used for that pad are after they've blended creating several secondary colors. Once you do that & have obtained the 5 colors of refill, just make a line of ink down the middle (as close as you can figure it anyway) of each main color area with the correct refill. The ink will spread until it meets ink coming from another direction then the 2 will blend a lil giving you those lovely secondary colors. Both kinds of dye ink rainbow pads do better if stored with the pad facing down. The color refresher mentioned earlier is perfect for one pad rainbow dye inks if you can't find the correct colors right away.

Rainbow pigment pads are easy to reink once you figure out the colors. If the individual lil pads lift out (as with many of the Clearsnap rainbow pigment pads) just lift out each lil pad and reink like any pigment ink pad. If the lil pads are attached to the base, you reink them by carefully adding a lil new ink to each section one at a time & working the ink in with the card before going to the next section. Clean the card between colors so as to not taint then next section. If the edges of the lil removable pigment pads are tainted from the inks on either side, you can use a paper towel to wipe the other color off. If the other color has stained the pad, use an alcohol free baby wipe to remove the ink stain.

The baby wipes are also useful for cleaning both types of ink pads if you accidently get another color on the surface. (I teach stamping classes and there's always at least one stamp pad where some enthusiatic student has transfered a dark color of ink to a lighter colored pad because they forgot to clean the stamp before changing colors.) Just gently rub at the offending spot with the wipe to remove the bulk of the stain. (you may not be able to get all of it out if it has been there for more than a few minutes) Then reink the pad in that area to replace the ink you blotted out while cleaning the stain.

Anything else, ladies, while my brains are still working? :D

j3annin3
09-09-2007, 12:42 PM
Wow, Inky Wiskers, i want to take a class from you. Just incidential information alone would be worth the class fee! What do you teach? Do you teach on line?

Inky Whiskers
09-09-2007, 01:50 PM
Gee Golly Gosh Thanks! :blush: Y'all are making a fuss and making me blush.

I'm a Stampin' Up! demonstrator & I teach classes with my up & down lines (& sometimes another demo friend) in my down line's apt. rec room and sometimes we take the fun on the road & do a workshop at somebodies home. We do a class or event about avery 6-8 weeks. I have one this Friday on punches. I'm in the Federal Way/Auburn area of King county, Washington state. I don't know where your blue house is in relation to my blue house. "D

The SU! customer web site has a demo locator to help you locate a demo near you. A good size chunk of my stamping info I got thru' SU! buy chatting with other demos on line & at training events, the demo web site & magazine. So other demos have much of the same info available to them. Oh and that messy trial & error thing too. :o You could also check out your local stamp or scrap stores as well as any conventions coming to your area. Folks just love to chat about stamping! Of course magazines have the occassional gem in their pages too. I think the best place to start is the manufacturer's website. Most products have the address on the packaging these days and most of the sites have a tips section & are willing to answer more specific questions about their product. There are also many online stamp companies that offer tips & techniques that can be found be doing a search for the technique rather than the product. (i.e. "reinking stamp pads" rather than "ink refills" if you want more info about reinking) These are all good places to learn more about stamping.

I haven't done anything that anybody else isn't capable of in my quest for stamping knowledge. It just takes time & a bit of perseverance to find it. Oh, remembering what you learn so you can share with others is good to! :))

Thank you ladies for your kind praises! I sure is nice to share my tidbits with an appreciative group. :D

bjames
09-09-2007, 05:32 PM
Thank you for all your expertise, but, still haven't gotten an answer about any household product that you can use to make your own ink pad "refresher". ( such as glycerin, alcohol, etc...) Will nothing work to get more mileage out of these already costly ink pads?

TimeforT
09-09-2007, 05:41 PM
Another big thank you Jenna....I'm saving this info now before I loose it!

Inky Whiskers
09-09-2007, 06:04 PM
Thank you for all your expertise, but, still haven't gotten an answer about any household product that you can use to make your own ink pad "refresher". ( such as glycerin, alcohol, etc...) Will nothing work to get more mileage out of these already costly ink pads?

All that typing & I missed the original question? Silly me! :))

As somebody else mentioned here spritzing dye ink pads with distilled water (tap water has minerals in it that can effect some ink colors/brands in the long run) can get you a lil more stamping power from them when you need to finish a project asap & can't wait until you get a refill. Spritzing may work with pigment inks as well in a pinch, but may dilute them too much for use embossing or stamping on dark color card stock. Glycerine may be a better choice for help extending pigment inks, but again, it may dilute the color too much to be much help.

Storing dye pads with the pad facing down keeps the ink at the surface of the pad & gently chopping the surface of pigment pads helps keep the ink mixed and brings it up to the surface, but alas, I don't know of any magic do it yourself at home formula for extending the ink in your pads w/o reinking.

You are so right that ink pads are expensive to collect. Ink refills are the most cost effective & reliable way to keep your ink pads going that I know of. If the color becomes unavailable, I find another color to use instead & may reuse the old pad with a new color refill to save $.

I'm sorry I didn't have the answer you were looking for. :(

alsmouse
09-09-2007, 09:32 PM
ANOTHER BIG WOWfor all the information. Thank you, Jenna. As usual you are a wealth of info. I actually hit print so it will go in my craft notes notebook. Too good to pass up.~C8>

Inky Whiskers
09-09-2007, 09:58 PM
Glad to be of service! :D

Purnima
09-12-2007, 02:13 PM
To rehydrate pads, I spray the lid of the pad instead of directly on to it. Then I close it up, turn it upside down and let nature do its thang! Takes longer, but it doesn't freak out the pad.

Another thing I do in a hurry is just huff on it, like you do on a stamp you've been coloring with markers. Sometimes that is enough. Of course, sometimes I hyperventilate. :eyeroll:

I have some Perfect Ink Refresher... I think it is first and foremost formulated for Ranger inks, especially the regular dye based ones. (I haven't tried it on the Distress Inks... has anyone else?) That is what I use it for and it is great for keeping the dye pads moist. I like it a lot for the Big & Juicy pads -- too much reinking of those seems to get the colors less vivid from running together. I don't think it should be used with permanent inks, since the ink base is different. I tried it on a Fluid Chalk ink pad, but it altered the color.

That's my bit of experience... OH! Almost forgot! I did use PIR to refresh some very old dye ink markers by Marvy that someone gave me. They are working like new! I did that about 2 years back and they still work great.

hugs! :wave:
Purnima

Purnima
09-12-2007, 02:16 PM
Oh, for goodness sakes... I left out that I was spraying the lids of the ink pads with WATER. Should read:

To rehydrate pads, I spray the lid of the pad with WATER instead of directly on to it. Then I close it up, turn it upside down and let nature do its thang! Takes longer, but it doesn't freak out the pad.

Sorry! Need more COFFEE! :o

hugs
Purnima

Inky Whiskers
09-12-2007, 03:03 PM
Thanks for the personal experience info, Purnima! I haven't used the refresher spray (I generally buy the refill when I buy the pad), so it's good to know what it's various uses & limits are. :D

bjames
09-16-2007, 05:00 PM
To rehydrate pads, I spray the lid of the pad instead of directly on to it. Then I close it up, turn it upside down and let nature do its thang! Takes longer, but it doesn't freak out the pad.

Another thing I do in a hurry is just huff on it, like you do on a stamp you've been coloring with markers. Sometimes that is enough. Of course, sometimes I hyperventilate. :eyeroll:

I have some Perfect Ink Refresher... I think it is first and foremost formulated for Ranger inks, especially the regular dye based ones. (I haven't tried it on the Distress Inks... has anyone else?) That is what I use it for and it is great for keeping the dye pads moist. I like it a lot for the Big & Juicy pads -- too much reinking of those seems to get the colors less vivid from running together. I don't think it should be used with permanent inks, since the ink base is different. I tried it on a Fluid Chalk ink pad, but it altered the color.

That's my bit of experience... OH! Almost forgot! I did use PIR to refresh some very old dye ink markers by Marvy that someone gave me. They are working like new! I did that about 2 years back and they still work great.

hugs! :wave:
Purnima
Purmima,
Thank you so much for your reply and information. You said,"I did use PIR to refresh some very old dye ink markers by Marvy that someone gave me. They are working like new! I did that about 2 years back and they still work great." Can you please tell me what "PIR" is?

stampin stacy
09-25-2007, 08:05 AM
It occurred to me that I could take my Whisper ink pads and re-ink them with similar color Marvy reinkers and thanks to this thread I know how to do just that. :applause:

The Whisper colors are okay but Marvy reinkers are more readily available. My LRSS usually carries them and they are sold at the Heirloom conventions too. Guess I need to get around to making a color sample sheet of all those colors before the next convention. :o